Category: Special Interest

Locally written columns of special interest to Dillon County citizens

The Diminishing Respect For Thanksgiving In America

I want to address an alarming issue that has been taking place for quite a few decades. It is something that has steadily grown in both scope and significance in our culture, so much so that the overwhelming majority of Americans have been unknowingly lured into it.

How Can We Stop The Violence And Killing?

I was awakened at about 12:30 a.m. on Tuesday, October 26, 2021, by a knock at my door from a deputy who works for the Dillon County Sheriff’s Department.

Conflicting Characters In A Corrupt Culture

Both the title, as well as the Shakespearian quote that followed are the inspiration for my column today. In a true sense, all the world is a stage and each of us are character actors in this ever-unfolding drama.

The Positive Effects Of COVID-19

0 Is it possible for something as deadly, detrimental, and debilitating as the COVID-19 pandemic to have a positive effect or silver lining? Can it be that something good and constructive can come out of the evil and grief that has been inflicted globally upon mankind by this killer disease that has claimed the lives…

Four Strangers In The Night

In my column today, I am going to attempt something that I seldom do.

The Sunday Before 9/11

The story that I am going to share with you about my personal involvement with the historical and unprecedented events that took place on September 11, 2001, may be hard for some to believe.

Dollarweed

Dollarweed (Hydrocotyle spp.) is a warm-season perennial weed. It gets its name from the silver-dollar shaped leaves.

Chamberbitter

Chamberbitter is a warm-season, annual weed that emerges in early summer. It reproduces by seeds that are found on the underside of each branchlet.

Anthurium

Anthurium is derived from the Greek words “anothos” and “oura” meaning flower and tail.

Florida Betony

Florida betony (Stachys floridana) is an aggressive weed native to Florida that appeared in South Carolina in the 1940s and 50s. It is also known as wild artichoke and rattlesnake weed.